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Welcome to Dixie County Clerk of Court & Comptroller

Dana D. Johnson, Clerk of Court for Dixie County, Florida is a duly elected Constitutional Officer. The Clerk of the Circuit Court is an elected office established according to the Florida Constitution for the purpose of serving the citizens of each county as a public trustee. As an elected official, the Clerk of the Circuit Court helps provide for the system of “checks and balances” that is the very foundation of the American form of government.

The goal of the Dixie County Clerk’s Office is to efficiently and effectively perform as clerk of the Circuit and County Courts, Clerk to the Board of County Commissioners, Recorder and Guardian of Public Records, Treasurer, Auditor and Custodian of all county funds.

The Office of the Clerk of the Circuit Court envisions earning the public trust through leadership in its diverse role as Clerk to the Courts, Guardian of Public Records and Auditor of the Public Resources and Systems. The Clerk’s Office will be an advocate for people in need of access to public resources and records. We will provide an efficient, friendly and professional work force prepared to meet changing customer needs. The Clerk’s Office will safeguard and enhance resources through strong internal audits and effective investment strategies

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Cross City Old A LargeThe lands which are now Dixie County have a rich history. With the Steinhatchee River on the west and the Suwannee River on the east, it was prime land for the Native Americans and early settlers.

According from one source, the first white man to come to the Dixie area was in 1820, a young man named George Miller who was from North Carolina.

He became friends with Suwannee and Bowlegs, Native Americans, and sons of Chief Tigertail and his wife, Suwannee, of the Seminole tribe, who settled in the region around Lake Miccosukee near what is now Tallahassee. With the blessings of the Indians, Miller settled in the area. He planted corn and peanuts and raised cattle and hogs. Ten years later he was to die from malaria and buried into what is now known as Old Town.